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How do I write my science project results?

Very clearly! Haha!

 

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by Lani Yamafuji in how to
How to Write Science Project Results

 

I was asked two questions today about science project results.

Keeli asks,

“I have a question about my results. Should I do them in more of like a list and explain how each product worked or in a paragraph about each product.”

Michael asks,

“Do you think that 1 paragraph for my results is good?”

What Happened?

The results of your science project are the written record of what happened during your experiment. So, hopefully you wrote things down, such as measurements and dates, as you were doing your project. Having enough data for a good looking graph is one reason to repeat your experiment multiple times.

Now that you’re done experimenting, go through your science journal collecting the data and organizing the words or numbers into neat charts and graphs. Try to make at least one of each.

Important – make sure your graphs are correctly and fully labeled so they explain your project. By looking at the graph, someone should be able to figure out what your whole experiment was about.

Make sure your graphs are fully labeled

My Secret

Honestly, as a science fair judge, sometimes I just skip over the reading and go straight to the pictures. Judges really don’t like having to search around the board for the meaning of the bars in your graph!

Under your chart and graph should be a written explanation of what you are looking at on your image. (Even though it should be obvious from your labeling). Keeli and Michael, your results should be in paragraph form, not a list, and in one or two paragraphs – depending on how many visuals you have.

You can start with, This chart shows… or This graph shows…

For example: This graph shows that after 4 trials the 2cm pine cube took an average time of 2.34 seconds to burn. The 2cm cedar cube took an average time of 3.65 seconds….

Since you are just explaining exactly what is in the chart or graph you are not giving your opinions of why things happened here. Save that for the conclusion.

And, that’s it on results. Chart, graph, explanation, done.

Do you have any other questions about parts of the science fair?

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GET YOUR FREE SCIENCE FAIR CHEAT SHEET!

Learn the 3 Secrets to Winning from a science fair judge, teacher, and mom. It could be life changing. Make this science fair the best ever!

it's 100% free!
Only for K-8th Grade Winners!